Transactions
of the Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station
Branta Cover Language of the article: Russian Cite: Domashevsky V, S. . (2002). About birds of prey migration in the foothills and mountains of the Crimea in autumn 2000.. Branta: Transactions of the Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station, 5, 139-142 Views: 437 Branta copyright Branta license

Branta Issues > Issue №5 (2002)

Branta: Transactions of the Azov-Black Sea Ornithological Station, 139-142

About birds of prey migration in the foothills and mountains of the Crimea in autumn 2000.

Domashevsky S. V.

The data presented in the article refer to observations and number of 24 birds of prey species, 1 species of Stork and 1 species of Crane. All the species were registered during the migratory period from three observation points in the foothills and mountainous part of the Crimea over the period September-October 2002. They were Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) - 5 birds; Honey Buzzard (Pernis apivorus) -1 9  birds; Black Kite (Milvus migrans) -1 0  birds; Hen Harrier (Circus cyaneus) - 5 birds; Montagu's Harrier (C. pygargus) - 3 birds; Marsh Harrier (C. aeruginosus) - 140 birds; Goshawk (Accipiter gentiles) - 4 birds; Sparrowhawk (A. nisus) -  829 birds; Long-legged Buzzard (Buteo rufinus) - 6 birds; Buzzard (Buteo buteo) - 852 birds; Short-toed Eagle (Circaetus gallicus) - 13 birds; Booted Eagle (Hieraaetus pennatus) - 6 birds; Steppe Eagle (Aquila rapax) - 1 bird; Spotted Eagle (A. clanga) - 20 birds; Spotted Eagle/Lesser Spotted Eagle (A. clanga/A. pomarina) - 8 birds; Imperial Eagle (A. heliaca) - 1 local bird; White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) - 1 bird; Black Vulture (Aegypius monachus) - 5 local birds; Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) - 6 local birds; Saker (Falco cherrug) - 5 birds; Peregrine (F. peregrinus) - 9 local birds; Hobby (F. subbuteo) - 40 birds; Merlin (F. columbarius) - 1 bird; Red-footed Falcon (F. vespertinus) -171 birds; Kestrel (F. tinnunculus) - 38 birds. There were also Black Stork (Ciconia nigra) - 50 birds; Crane (Grus grus) - 266 birds.

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